Why everyone should want to be a SENDCO

All teachers should want to be a SENDCO. Whether for the professional development it brings, for the difference it can make to pupils who otherwise might struggle, or just to step up to a whole-school role, ambitious colleagues should view it as an essential step on their own route to leadership.

The Spring term SENDCO

It’s a strange time of year. Too late to set an initiative up for the academic year; too early to write something off until next academic year. Here’s 7 things to be considering as you embark on the Spring term as a SENDCO. Recall your successes Think back to the Autumn term and all thatContinue reading “The Spring term SENDCO”

What to do about data

In various schools and for various SENDCOs, there is too much or too little data, data that’s not well-shared or data that requires a degree to interpret. What follows hopes to guide you to know what you might look out for in terms of your context, your attendance, your behaviour/exclusions and your academic outcomes. NothingContinue reading “What to do about data”

Starting as a SENDCO in September? Find 10 hours to do these 10 things before you break up for the summer

If you’re embarking on your first SENDCO role in September, you will not get to the summer holidays with total readiness. But if you can find 10 hours to do these 10 tasks, in no particular order, you’ll give yourself the best headstart possible.

How to fix a broken inclusion system

In the first blogpost, I argued that the system of supporting children and young people with complex needs is broken. It punishes schools whose Headteachers see inclusion as their duty, rewarding those who put up barriers to inclusion. What would a fairer system look like? What incentives would need to exist for balance to beContinue reading “How to fix a broken inclusion system”